Grenoside Community Primary School

Grenoside Community Primary School Grenoside Community Primary School

Communication • Co-operation • Self-esteem • Creativity • Independence • Reflection

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Expectations of a Year 3 Pupil


This section of the booklet provides information for parents and carers about the end of year expectations for children in our school. These expectations have been identified as being the minimum requirements your child must meet in order to ensure continued progress throughout the following year.

All the objectives will be worked on throughout the year and will be the focus of direct teaching. Any extra support you can provide in helping your child to achieve these is greatly valued. If you have any queries regarding the content of this booklet or want support in knowing how best to help your child, please talk to your child's teacher.

Reading

  • apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet
  • read exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound.
  • develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
  • listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and textbooks
  • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
  • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally
  • identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books
  • preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
  • discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
  • recognising some different forms of poetry
  • understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:
  • checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context
  • asking questions to improve their understanding of a text
  • drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
  • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
  • identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
  • retrieve and record information from non-fiction
  • participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

 

Speaking and Listening

  • listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions
  • give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings
  • maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments
  • use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English
  • participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and debates
  • gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)
  • consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others
  • select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.

Writing

  • use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them
  • spell further homophones
  • spell words that are often misspelt
  • place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals [for example, girls’, boys’] and in words with irregular plurals [for example, children’s]
  • use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary
  • write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.
  • use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting [for example, by ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of writing are spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do not touch].
  • plan their writing by:
  • discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar
  • discussing and recording ideas
  • draft and write by:
  • composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures organising paragraphs around a theme
  • in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot
  • in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings]
  • evaluate and edit by:
  • assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements
  • proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors
  • read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.

  

Punctuation and Grammar

 

  • extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although
  • using the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense
  • choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition
  • using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause
  • using fronted adverbials
  • indicate grammatical and other features by:
  • using commas after fronted adverbials
  • indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with plural nouns
  • using and punctuating direct speech
  • use and understand the grammatical terminology.

Year 3 and 4 spelling rules

Adding suffixes

 -ing, =er E.g. forgetting, forgotten, beginning, beginner, prefer, preferred gardening, gardener, limiting, limited, limitation

–ation -. E.g. information, adoration, sensation, preparation, admiration.

 –ly - E.g. sadly, completely, usually comically happily, angrily gently, simply, humbly, nobly, basically, frantically, dramatically.

–ous -. E.g. poisonous, dangerous, mountainous, famous, various, tremendous, enormous, jealous.   

Prefixes

 dis–: disappoint, disagree, disobey  mis–: misbehave, mislead, misspell  in–: inactive, incorrect. il. E.g. illegal, illegible. im–. E.g. immature, immortal, impossible, impatient, imperfect. ir– E.g. irregular, irrelevant, irresponsible. re : redo, refresh, return, reappear, redecorate. sub–: subdivide, subheading, submarine, submerge. inter–: interact, intercity, international, interrelated super–: supermarket, superman, superstar. anti–: antiseptic, anti-clockwise, antisocial. auto–: autobiography, autograph.

Words with endings sounding like or /ʒə/

e.g. teacher, catcher, richer, stretcher. E.g. measure, treasure, pleasure, enclosure, creature, furniture, picture, nature, adventure.

Endings which sound like /ʒən/. E.g. division, invasion, confusion, decision, collision, television.

 

–ous. E.g. humorous, glamorous, vigorous,  courageous, outrageous, serious, obvious, curious hideous, spontaneous, courteous.

Endings which sound like spelt –tion, –sion, –ssion, –cian /ʃən/

E.g. invention, injection, action, hesitation, completion. 

expression, discussion, confession, permission, admission.

expansion, extension, comprehension, tension

musician, electrician, magician, politician, mathematician.

Words with the /k/ sound spelt ch – E.g. scheme, chorus, chemist, echo, character.

Words with the /ʃ/ sound spelt ch  E.g. chef, chalet, machine, brochure.

Words ending with the /g/ sound spelt –gue and the /k/ sound spelt –E.g. league, tongue, antique, unique.

Words with the /s/ sound spelt sc - E.g. science, scene, discipline, fascinate, crescent.

Words with the /eɪ/ sound spelt ei, eigh, or ey – E.g. vein, weigh, eight.

Possessive apostrophe with plural words - E.g. girls’, boys’, babies’, children’s, men’s, mice’s.

Homophones and near-homophones – E.g. accept/except, affect/effect, ball/bawl, berry/bury, brake/break, fair/fare, grate/great, groan/grown, here/hear, heel/heal/he’ll, knot/not, mail/male, main/mane, meat/meet, medal/meddle, missed/mist, peace/piece, plain/plane, rain/rein/reign, scene/seen, weather/whether, whose/who’s.

The /ɪ/ sound spelt y -  E.g. myth, gym, Egypt, pyramid, mystery

The /ʌ/ sound spelt ou - young, touch, double, trouble, country

 

Year 3 and 4 spelling list

These are words and spelling patterns which Y3s and 4s are expected to be able to spell -  how many can your child spell?

accident

caught

eighth

heart

naughty

probably

surprise

accidentally

centre

enough

height

notice

promise

therefore

actual

century

exercise

history

occasion

purpose

though

actually

certain

experience

imagine

occasionally

quarter

although

address

circle

experiment

increase

often

question

thought

answer

complete

extreme

important

opposite

recent

through

appear

consider

famous

interest

ordinary

regular

various

arrive

continue

favourite

island

particular

reign

weight

believe

decide

February

knowledge

peculiar

remember

woman

bicycle

describe

forward/s

length

perhaps

sentence

women

breath

different

fruit

library

popular

separate

 

breathe

difficult

grammar

material

possess

special

 

build

disappear

group

medicine

possession

straight

 

busy

early

guard

mention

possible

strange

 

business

earth

guide

minute

potatoes

strength

 

calendar

eight

heard

natural

pressure

suppose

 

 

 

Expectations of a Y3 pupil in mathematics

  • count from 0 in multiples of 4, 8, 50 and 100; find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number
  • recognise the place value of each digit in a three-digit number (hundreds, tens, ones)
  • compare and order numbers up to 1000
  • identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations
  • read and write numbers up to 1000 in numerals and in words
  • solve number problems and practical problems involving these ideas.
  • add and subtract numbers mentally, including:
    • o a three-digit number and ones
    • o a three-digit number and tens
    • o a three-digit number and hundreds
  • add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction
  • estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers
  • solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction.
  • recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables
  • write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables that they know, including for two-digit numbers times one-digit numbers, using mental and progressing to formal written methods
  • solve problems, including missing number problems, involving multiplication and division, including positive integer scaling problems and correspondence problems in which n objects are connected to m objects.
  • count up and down in tenths; recognise that tenths arise from dividing an object into 10 equal parts and in dividing one-digit numbers or quantities by 10
  • recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators
  • recognise and use fractions as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators
  • recognise and show, using diagrams, equivalent fractions with small denominators
  • add and subtract fractions with the same denominator within one whole [for example, 5/7 + 1/7 = 6/7)
  • compare and order unit fractions, and fractions with the same denominators
  • solve problems that involve all of the above.
  • measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml)
  • measure the perimeter of simple 2-D shapes
  • add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts
  • tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals from I to XII, and 12-hour and 24-hour clocks
  • estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute; record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours; use vocabulary such as o’clock, a.m./p.m., morning, afternoon, noon and midnight
  • know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year
  • compare durations of events [for example to calculate the time taken by particular events or tasks].
  • draw 2-D shapes and make 3-D shapes using modelling materials; recognise 3-D shapes in different orientations and describe them
  • recognise angles as a property of shape or a description of a turn
  • identify right angles, recognise that two right angles make a half-turn, three make three quarters of a turn and four a complete turn; identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle
  • identify horizontal and vertical lines and pairs of perpendicular and parallel lines.
  • interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables
  • solve one-step and two-step questions [for example, ‘How many more?’ and ‘How many fewer?’] using information presented in scaled bar charts and pictograms and tables.